Tag Archives: videos

Meet the Flat Earth Asshole

The Flat Earth Asshole, run by Jake Gibson, is one of the most funny, entertaining and authentic YouTube channels ever.  Jake just received a fake, unjustified copyright strike from American talk radio host John B. Wells, so I thought I’d put his channel up.

Jake is a YouTuber from Modesto, California, and holds a BA in Psychology, just in case you wonder.

Make sure to check his channel out.  You don’t need to subscribe to all his opinions to enjoy it.

Image courtesy of Jake Gibson •

Rumsfeld, Kissinger Admit to Faking Moon Landing with Stanley Kubrick

Did you ever wonder whether the American government conquered the moon in 1969, the very year, where the best automobile any government could build was the Trabant P601?

Trabant P601, 1969. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Trabant P601, 1969. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Or why the lunar module of Apollo 11 looks like a homeless Continue reading Rumsfeld, Kissinger Admit to Faking Moon Landing with Stanley Kubrick

New Building 7 Video Blows Away the Mainstream Narrative of 9/11

Before the WTC building 7 was demolished, several explosions were  recorded.  They have never been compiled in a single video.  Contains excerpts from several other recent #altNews podcasts about various other psyops.  Mind-blowing to say the least.

Image courtesy of informationliberation.com ◻︎

The Green Inferno

At last released in the Unites States (after much controversy, to say the least), The Green Inferno by director Eli Roth (Cabin Fever, Grindhouse, Hostel) promises first-class horror entertainment. I didn’t watch it yet, but you can probably not go entirely wrong with this one. Plus, I wanted to the test the WordPress for iPhone app, so I needed to post a few lines quickly…

Magnet

From Farm to Fridge

The 10 minutes documentary Farm to Fridge, originally published by Mercy for Animals, graphically summarizes the ordeal millions of animals have to go through day by day — until their meat finally lands on our plates.

This video contains scenes and images which are extremely disturbing.  I take cruelty and injustice very badly.  If you feel like me and believe you have seen similar documentaries in the past on how animals suffer on industrial farms and in slaughterhouses, then there is probably no point in torturing yourself again.

“The only good cage is an empty cage.”
— Lawrence Anthony, The Elephant Whisperer

If you haven’t … well, maybe it encourages you to buy meat only from farmers who treat their animals with respect and dignity — or to consider a vegetarian or vegan diet.   If you can’t do it always, then more and more often is a good start. ◻︎

Traffic Sign Cattle

The content of the following documentary is disturbing.  Viewer discretion is advised.

Image courtesy of costumefail.com

Drogen : Amerikas längster Krieg 

Deutsche Fassung von Eugene Jareckis exzellenter Dokumentation „America’s Longest War” („The House I Live in”), 2013.

Drogen: Amerikas längster Krieg (3 Teile, Playlist)

Seit 1971 kostete der „Krieg gegen die Drogen“ über 1 Billion Dollar und führte zu 45 Millionen Verhaftungen und zu hunderttausenden Toten. Er machte Amerika zu dem Land mit den meisten Häftlingen der Welt.  Während der Drogenkrieg heute terroristische Organisationen in Afrika und Asien finanziert, blieb der Drogenkonsum in Amerika dennoch unverändert. Es kam aufgrund der Illegalität lediglich zu härteren und konzentrierteren Formen der Drogen.

Ausgezeichnete geschichtliche und gesellschaftliche Analyse der Ursachen und der Folgen der Prohibition. Jarecki schürft tief und erkennt selbst deren diskriminierenden und rassistischen Komponenten.  Er regt dazu an, alte Denkmuster über Bord zu werfen und ein System zu hinterfragen, das auf Unwissenheit, Unvernunft und zynischer Heuchelei beruht.

Eine der besten Dokumentationen, die jemals zu diesem Thema gemacht wurden.  Gewann unter anderem den Großen Preis der Jury beim Sundance Film Festival. ◻︎

Tim Wise : White Like Me

Race, Racism and White Privilege in America

The continued prominence of racism is explored through the prism of white privilege in the engrossing documentary White Like Me. Based upon a book of the same name by author Tim Wise, the film explores the many advantages afforded to whites throughout the history of the United States, and the extent to which they have defined a culture of racial discrimination that continues to this day.

The shameful days of blatant segregation thankfully exist in the rear-view mirror of the country’s history.  But although great attempts have been made to achieve racial equality, America is nowadays more segregated than ever before, with cities like Los Angeles, Miami, Chicago, and New York taking the lead. The residue of discrimination still reverberates in nearly every corner of society. The film argues that the promise of a post-racial society has not yet been realized, and that the deeply embedded traditions of white privilege are largely to blame.

„For more than twenty years now, I’ve been trying to better understand for myself and to raise awareness among others how dangerous and damaging it is when white people like me are blind to racial inequality and our own privileges,” says Wise in the film. That search for understanding begins in a study of the laws, policies and institutions that have long informed America’s identity, including the Naturalization Act of 1790, and the initial enactments of programs that ensured social security and veteran benefits.

Whether obvious or insidious in their approach, the documentary contends that each of these instances catered to some level of racial discrimination in their formation, and set a foundation from which individual attitudes and governmental policies continue to operate.

White Like Me goes on to explore avenues like education, housing, the prison system, the government-waged War on Drugs, and additional aspects of American society in which racial discrimination still plays an informing role. Along the way, the film also tackles the notion of reverse racism in the age of affirmative action, and the belief that America has moved beyond matters of race in the wake of electing its first president of color. White Like Me handles these potentially inflammatory subjects with great sensitivity and frankness, and supports its assertions with a wealth of enlightening facts and data.

© Media Education Foundation, 2013

Published based on a Standard YouTube License.  To be used within the borders of the Fair Use clause of the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, which allows for the rebroadcast of copyrighted materials for the purposes of commentary, criticism, and education.

Watch ,White Like Me’ ($4.99, Vimeo on Demand)
Licensing by Media Education Foundation